Posts tagged publications

New paper on vertical structure of poleward energy flux

PhD student Chris Cardinale leads this new paper “Stratospheric and Tropospheric Flux Contributions to the Polar Cap Energy Budgets”, now accepted in Journal of Climate.

In this, Chris’s first peer-reviewed publication, we look at the detailed temporal and vertical structure of the poleward fluxes of moist static energy using the NASA-MERRA-2 reanalysis. We are interested in separating the effects of stratospheric and tropospheric circulations on the total poleward energy transport, as well as the differing impacts of these circulations on the energy budget of the polar regions.

The "curtain plot", Figure 1 from Cardinale et al. (2021) J. Climate.

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New paper by Rose, Cronin and Bitz on exoplanet ice cover at low and high obliquity

Brian’s latest paper (with colleagues Tim Cronin from MIT and Cecilia Bitz from UW) is called “Ice Caps and Ice Belts: the effects of obliquity on ice-albedo feedback”. It has been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. The paper looks at the basic rules governing planetary ice extent on Earth-like exoplanets at different obliquities. Click here for a preprint of the accepted manuscript.

Obliquity is the angle of a planet’s axis of rotation relative to its orbital plane. On Earth that angle is about 23.5º, and among other things, is the reason we have seasons. Something funny happens for planets at obliquity angles exceeding 55º. When you average over a whole year, the total amount of sunlight is largest at the poles and smallest at the equator.

Obliquity sketch

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New paper by Rose and Rayborn on effects of ocean heat uptake

The latest paper from our group has been accepted for publication in Current Climate Change Reports. We wrote this piece at the invitation of the section editor Mark Zelinka.

The paper is Rose and Rayborn, “The effects of ocean heat uptake on transient climate sensitivity”. It deals with the phenomenon of time-dependent climate sensitivity, and explores some compelling new ideas about connections between the oceans, atmospheric radiation, and global cloud cover that determine climate sensitivity. Our paper includes substantial review as well as some interesting original results and speculations.

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Snowball Earth synthesis submitted to Science Advances

Brian contributed to a new synthesis article on the geology and climate dynamics of Snowball Earth, just submitted to Science Advances.

The lead author is Paul F. Hoffman, the geologist who has been the leading champion of the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth hypothesis. Dr. Hoffman has long advocated for the importance of forward modeling studies of the physical and chemical environment of a Snowball Earth event, to bring context and constraints to the interpretation of the geological record. Along the way, he has cultivated relationships with some of the best climate dynamicists and modelers in the business. This review article summarizes recent progress on understanding the most profound episodes of global environmental change in Earth history.

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Water vapor paper posted online

Our latest paper: The vertical structure of tropospheric water vapor: comparing radiative and ocean-driven climate changes, by Rose and Rencurrel, is in press for Journal of Climate. See previous post for a description. The preprint is now available online from my publication page, or directly from Journal of Climate.

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Water vapor paper accepted in J. Climate

Our latest paper: The vertical structure of tropospheric water vapor: comparing radiative and ocean-driven climate changes, by Rose and Rencurrel, is now accepted for publication in Journal of Climate.

The paper looks at rates of change of precipitable water with surface temperature in a suite of simulations driven by different combinations of greenhouse gas forcing and prescribed ocean heat uptake. We find fractional rates ranging between 3.6 and 11 %/K globally. These results seem at first glance to suggest substantial departures from Clausius-Clapeyron scaling, but actually result from different spatial patterns of temperature change and nearly fixed relative humidity.

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New paper submitted

New paper submitted to Journal of Climate: The vertical structure of tropospheric water vapor: comparing radiative and ocean-driven climate changes, by Rose and Rencurrel.

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Waterbelts paper accepted

“Waterbelts” paper accepted for publication in JGR. And here it is.

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Waterbelts paper submitted

New paper submitted to JGR: Stable “Waterbelt” climates controlled by tropical ocean heat transport: a non-linear coupled climate mechanism of relevance to Snowball Earth

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Heat uptake paper featured on Oceans@MIT

Oceans@MIT news feature about my work on the climate response to ocean heat uptake, and related work by MIT researchers on the dynamics of ocean heat uptake.

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Heat uptake paper accepted

New paper accepted in GRL. And here it is.

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Heat uptake paper submitted

New paper just submitted to GRL: The dependence of transient climate sensitivity and radiative feedbacks on the spatial pattern of ocean heat uptake, by Rose, Armour, Battisti, Feldl and Koll.

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